NEW Ethos Webinar: Pressure Ulcers In Critical Care Patients – The Role of Tissue Deformation & Impact of Anti-Deformation Technology

  • Wednesday 27th January, 12-1pm
  • Wednesday 24th February, 12-1pm
  • Wednesday 24th March, 12-1pm

In DHG’s latest live Ethos webinars, Prof. Amit Gefen explores the role of tissue deformation within the critically ill patient population, and how technologies can be applied to minimise deformation that may help to significantly reduce pressure ulcer incidence within this clinical setting.

Latest research demonstrates that cell and tissue deformation is a principle cause of pressure ulcers within the very early minutes of development. Critical and Intensive Care patients are at an increased risk of pressure ulcer formation, particularly due to immobility and multiple organ failure, resulting in higher pressure ulcer incidence rates and prevalence than any other care setting. Data from a large-scale study of 13,254 patients across 1,117 Intensive Care Units revealed that 59.2% (3,997) of pressure ulcers were ICU-acquired.

With the cost to treat a single pressure ulcer as much as £16,000*, further understanding into optimal prevention of this important and costly patient safety threat is imperative.

In this live webinar, Prof. Amit Gefen explores the role of tissue deformation within the critically ill patient population, and how technologies can be applied to minimise deformation that may help to significantly reduce pressure ulcer incidence within this clinical setting.

Learning Objectives:
• Understanding the role of tissue deformation in pressure ulcer aetiology
• Identify the risks related to tissue deformation within the ICU/Critical Care setting
• Explore anti-deformation technology and its role in pressure ulcer management in Critical Care patients
• Consider the role of anti-deformation technology in comparison to alternating air therapy within the Critical Care setting

To register for this Ethos Webcast, please click here

References:

1. Gefen, A. (2018). The Future of Pressure Ulcer Prevention is Here: Detecting and Targeting Inflammation Early. EWMA Journal. 19(2):7-13

2. Labeau, S. et al. (2020). Prevalence, Associated Factors and Outcomes of Pressure Injuries in Adult Intensive Care Unit Patients: The DecubICUs Study. Intensive Care Med. Oct 9. doi: 10.1007/s00134-020-06234-9. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 33034686.

3. Dealey, C., Posnett, J., & Walker, A. (2012). The Cost of Pressure Ulcers in the United Kingdom. J Wound Care. 21(6):261-262.

*Adjusted for inflation.